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The Easy Seasonal Flower Guide You Need May 01, 2018 04:55

Los Angeles Florist
Flowers are nature's most versatile gift. They can be used in a variety of different ways: medicinally, in cooking, home decor, gardens, and also literally, as gifts.

Whether they're given as a celebration of a milestone, an aid in recovery, or to ease the pain of a loss, anyone can appreciate a beautiful bouquet of flowers.

There are just so many flowers out there, though. Scientists currently estimate that there are 400,000 different species of flowering plants on Earth. How do you choose?

Well, it helps that your selection is narrowed down for you depending on the time of the year. When considering putting together a flower arrangement or bouquet, you should always select a seasonal flower to build it with.

Below, we've broken down the different types of flowers available by season.

Your Seasonal Flower Guide

Like with grocery store produce, different flowers have different availability depending on the season. Of course, it's always springtime somewhere on the planet, but off-season flowers, similar to produce, will be more expensive. You're better off buying what's blooming in your own hemisphere.

So enough with the build-up, let's get into it.

Spring

We all know the old saying: April shows bring May flowers. Springtime is the time of the year when most flowers bloom.

In order for a flower to grow and bloom, it requires ample sunlight, water, and warmth. Spring delivers all of these. It's a rainy time of the year with warm temperatures and longer days, providing everything a flower needs to grow.

Because of this, there are a ton of flowers to choose from. This is partly why spring is the busy season for weddings.

Spring generally runs from late March to late June and within this timeframe, you have roses, tulips, lilacs, daisies daffodils, cherry blossoms, violets, and azaleas to choose from. There is so much more we could list, but suffice it to say, your options are limitless.

You can be sure that your spring bouquet will be colorful and elegant.

Summer

As far as flowers are concerned, summer is just an extension of spring. You may feel the increased heat, but they won't. Certain flowers, like irises, can be considered spring or summer flowers and you wouldn't be wrong either way.

The only thing that can affect flower growth in the summer is drought, which we know all too well in southern California.

That being said, if the rains are generous, you can find a similarly large variety of flowers in late summer as you can in spring.

On top of the flowers listed above, you can also find hydrangeas, sunflowers, gardenias, chrysanthemums, snapdragons, and many more.

Autumn

Typically, flowers only bloom when there are enough sunlight hours of the day (more on this later), otherwise, they shut down. For some flowers, autumn is that time. At this time of the year, your seasonal flower options begin to dwindle.

If you live in a less volatile climate whose seasonal changes are less severe (like southern California), however, you may still have a bevy of options to choose from. And even in harsher climates, many flowers continue to bloom well into fall.

Flowers like marigolds, carnations, chrysanthemums, daisies, roses, and some lilies can all be easily found in autumn.

Winter

It is during this time of year that flower blooming reaches a near-complete halt. The days get much shorter, depending on your latitude, during the winter and so the flowers mostly stop blooming. But some do not. Here's some science for you:

All flowers have a gene that decides when to bloom called CONSTANS. This gene is only triggered in the light and tells the flower to bloom once the amount of sunlight available surpasses a certain threshold.

A separate gene called DNF (Day Neutral Flowering). In normal flowers, the DNF gene suppresses the activation of the CONSTANS gene until there is enough daylight.

Some flowers, however, do not have this gene, or its defective, and so they bloom during the winter months anyway.

Because of this, it is possible to find rogue flowers that are still available during winter. They're still most likely grown in areas without a true winter and are imported. One such place is right here in SoCal, so you still have plenty of options in the winter months.

Roses, amaryllis, carnations, and chrysanthemums are still readily available during the winter. Of course, there is also the poinsettia flower, which is wildly popular as a gift around Christmastime thanks to its festive red and green colors.

The Poinsettia is a quintessential winter seasonal flower because it isn't really a flower at all. While they're generally mistaken for petals, the red parts of a poinsettia are actually leaves.

Those red leaves, scientifically known as bracts, actually require darkness to get their dark red color, making them a perfect winter plant.

Additional Quick Tips

All the seasonal flower knowledge in the world won't help you if you don't know anything about the person you're buying them for.

In order to maximize the satisfaction a floral gift can provide, find out what colors or even smells the receiver likes.

More importantly, make sure that the person you're giving flowers to doesn't have any severe plant allergies that could turn a well-intentioned gift into a disaster.

Make sure you relay all of this information to your florist before you buy a bouquet or arrangement.

Need Help Choosing Flowers?

Knowing about which flowers are in season and which aren't isn't all you need when putting together a flower arrangement or bouquet. You also have to have an eye for design and color.

If you're not comfortable in this area, you may just want to leave it to the experts. If you're looking for an arrangement or bouquet, consider checking out our original floral gift selection.

We also provide options for any occasion. Whether you need flowers for a birthday, wedding, graduation, a funeral, or hospital visit, we've got you covered.

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